Greet people when they come home

It’s been a relaxing day. The sun has streamed intermittently through various windows (why it moves throughout the day, Cooper will never understand) and these have been good spots to curl up in. The sun is now fading and this means he must keep a vigilant ear out for any tell-tale sounds that someone is returning home.

Who arrives home first varies. The sounds are distinctive and unique for the coming home routine. First there’s the noise of tyres slowly turning onto the driveway outside of the front window. A low humming, vibrating noise gets louder as it comes nearer and then the crackle of gravel. This already gives away who it is, the sounds are different for each of them.

Next there’s an achingly long moment with the idly, throbbing, resonating noise. And then it stops. The silence is the time to leap up. Cooper knows it is such a short distance between driveway and front door, but it seems to take them a maddeningly long time to walk it. How hard is it to get into the house from a few feet away?! He would have made it in a split second. He expresses his distaste at all this waiting by leaping on the sofa, and off, and rushing in a half circle before bounding across the room. He can’t contain his frenetic energy!

The next sound is the best sound: key in door. The metal clanks into the keyhole, pauses, and then hesitantly turns. If he hadn’t already worked out who it was going to be from the other sounds, this identifying noise would confirm definitively the identity of the returning owner. With a sharp twist of the handle – there he is!

Greet peopleOMG OMG OMG! The excitement is so overwhelming Cooper doesn’t know what to do first. Should he greet with a leap? Bark a hello? Bark an admonishment for being left alone so long (but only a gentle one)? Show his owner one of his toys? Rotate in a circle with giddiness? Run off into another room and back just because? There’s so many things to do and only a split second in which to convey all those feelings across! Does he get it?! Cooper is totally and completely happy! He’s home, he’s home, he’s home! YAY! This is the best! “He can feed me dinner! Walk me! Play with me! Stroke my tummy!” It’s going to be so much fun!

His owner puts down his bag to give him some attention. Ooooo; bag. As usual, Cooper suspects any bag is full to the brim with treats, sausages and huge steaks, so he takes a pause in the greeting ceremony to investigate the contents of the bag. For some reason his owner is swishing him away. Maybe the bag isn’t full of treats, sausages and huge steaks for him? Bit odd, but okay. Back to greeting! Yay! Jumpity jump! Awooowwoooowoooowooowooo!

What can you learn from your dog?

We soon get used to each other in relationships. That frisson of excitement when we see one another begins to dampen over time. But it is truly nice to feel greeted and appreciated. Who doesn’t love a “Hi, honey, I’m home!” moment on the threshold? Stop browsing social media on that phone, pause that TV rerun, and come say hello to your returning partner at the doorway with a big smile, hug and a kiss. Yay, they’re home!

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Smell good

Cooper enjoys his morning walks. Overnight there have been all sorts of mysterious wildlife creatures scampering across the fields and pushing their way through bushes, leaving their intriguing scent behind. Being a hound, this is Cooper’s job: investigating all the smells.

With his nose to the ground, he scoots along narrating his findings to no one in particular: “ahh yes, that’s nice… I recognise that one… ooo, what’s this one… backtrack, backtrack, yes, yes, that’s a good one… seems to go over there, and then back round here… OH! This smell is much better here… I will follow it round and about, over here… lovely”. His snuffling sounds like a piglet hunting for truffles and he has lost all real world connection to his owner and whatever else is going on around him. He takes these sniffing expeditions very seriously. But suddenly he stops in his tracks, nose tingling. “WHAT IS THIS?! This is AMAZING. Wowie, this smell is like what Heaven must smell like”. All thought of following a night-time rabbit’s excursion have disappeared from his agenda. This smell consumes him. It is the most incredible thing.

Cooper has found some fox poo.

Smell goodNow what should you do if you find fox poo? Being such an wondrous and delightful smell, wouldn’t it be excellent to have it all over one’s body? Then the smell can be carried around, wafting its gorgeous scent to everyone. It would improve their day and maybe make them a little jealous of his luck in finding it. This is an excellent idea. Cooper backs up and then takes a small running leap, flips at the last moment and smears his back, zig-zagging on the ground. The back is the best place, there’s a good amount of surface area and you can really get a big trail down the spine. Out of the corner of his eye, as he continues to wiggle across the ground, smearing more all over, he can see his owner sprinting towards him yelling his name, over and over. What’s her problem? There’s more than enough for them both.

What can you learn from your dog?

Cover yourself in fox poo. Wait, no…

The right smell is an amazingly evocative sense both enticing good memories and uplifting your mood. Spray your favourite perfume and cologne liberally to enjoy throughout your day. If you don’t want to douse yourself in your favourite scent, keep fresh and clean-smelling. It feels marvellous to smell good.

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Respect your bed

Time for a mid-mid-afternoon nap. There are many places throughout the house that suit nappage, but Cooper feels in a blanket-ey kind of mood today so he makes his way into the lounge. Jumping onto the sofa he sees that his blanket is not in the right position AT ALL. Who left it like this?! Incredible.

With soft little whines, he coaxes the blanket to be flatter: over there a bit, no, more like this; he manoeuvres it into place. He surveys his work. Yes, that’s better. But how to get comfortable within its blanket-ey embrace? Making urgent little noises now (after all, nap time is now overdue and this process is eating into valuable chasing dreams time), he gets into the centre of the blanket and moves clockwise, stamping down any imperfections as he goes. Around once: creases begin to straighten. Around twice: the puffiness is squashed out. And around once more to catch any possible mid sleep irritations that aren’t visible to the naked eye. Pretty tired from his pre-sleep bed readiness exercise, he realises he’s been in a circle three times in one direction. He makes a quick, tight turn anticlockwise for luck. And… slump. Sleep may now happen. 30 seconds later and impressive snores are coming from within the perfectly curated blanket.

Respect your bedWhat can you learn from your dog?

Can there be a more wonderful feeling than slipping into a newly made bed? Crisp sheets, cool to the touch. A plump pillow. The smell of the fabric softener. Whatever else has happened that day, you have reclaimed your night because you are just going to sleep so, so well. Snore like a content blissful beagle.

 


 

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Save for a rainy day

Cooper does like to live in the now. He doesn’t know or care if it’s a Tuesday, he doesn’t really know what’s going to be happening in the next ten minutes. Living in the moment is fine by him. However, he does like to save – if he can – for his future self.

His owner has just come back from the shops, laden down with lots of bags. She doesn’t seem to be completely keen on him jumping up on her. Can’t she see he’s trying to greet her? I mean, clearly he’s also trying to get a cheeky look in these interesting bags. They smell amazing! She staggers into the kitchen and Cooper follows, having a good wag. He expects that these bags are a present for him and he’ll shortly be allowed to rifle through and pick what he fancies. Hmm, though putting them all on the counter isn’t helpful, he can’t get up that high.

She’s talking to him now – about who knows what – but then she does like to communicate vocally. He gives her a wag; it’s probably about these bags and how they are for him. Ah, but she has opened a smaller paper bag, and this one smells glorious. OMG, it’s a BONE! Cooper leaps up. This is so exciting! The thing is enormous. Look at it! Two knuckles at either end, cream coloured with small bits of meat clinging to it along its length. It might just be the most beautiful thing he has ever seen. And here it comes, it’s being offered to him, laid on the kitchen floor. Well, obviously, he is up for it. He’ll take it off your hands if you don’t need it.

He grabs one end of the bone in his mouth and tries to pick it up. It’s pretty heavy and he can’t get it off the ground. This may require some dragging action. He can see that the door to the garden has been opened for him – fantastic, a good place to concentrate on owning the hell out of this bone while catching some rays. He drags it haphazardly over the linoleum, over the door stoop and carefully down the step. He has a wary eye out in case his owner tries to rudely take his present back. He drops his bone onto the middle of the patio and examines it. This is a full afternoon’s work. Worthy work. Challenging and rewarding work. He gives the middle a tentative lick and closes his eyes. That’s some good bone. Now, let’s get cracking.

Over the course of the next few hours, all that can be heard from Cooper is a constant gnawing as he systematically breaks down the bone. The meat is now gone. Then the bone is reduced by half. His jaw aches from the effort and his tummy throbs with the amount he’s consumed. He can’t carry on. It’s been a valiant effort but he doesn’t have it in him to complete this mission. He needs to sleep to recover. He needs a good, hearty intake of water. He needs to revisit this bone another day.

Save for a rainy dayHe looks around, surveying the bushes round the edges of the garden. It’s going to have to be his favourite one, the big green one with space for a small dog to crawl under. The bone is now smaller and easier to carry, so he takes it in his mouth and quietly wanders over to his hiding place. Can’t be too loud or he’ll attract attention. He lays the bone down gently and his paws slowly scrape the soil by the roots. He picks up the bone and drops it in the shallow pit. He pushes some soil roughly with his snout, covering it up a bit. That’ll do. What an amazing hiding place and what an excellently hidden bone.

Till tomorrow.

What can you learn from your dog?

You slip on a jacket you haven’t worn for a while and – what do you know – there’s a £20 note in the pocket! Is it your instinct to want to spend all of it immediately? How about buying just a small treat and then popping the rest into a piggy bank or savings account. It’s a nice feeling to help out a future you by squirrelling away the extra you don’t need right now. You know it makes sense. Save for a rainy day.

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