Zig Zag

Now Cooper is well aware there is an optimal route between A and B. If he were at position A and there were a mysterious cat at position B, he would launch like a rocket between the two points, perhaps breaking the sound barrier in the process. He knows there’s a fast way to get over there, but… is that usually the most interesting way to get there?

Zig ZagFor Cooper, he likes the scenic route. Because the world he is in has haphazard smells all over the place, it’s important to take a zigzag route to best find as many of them as possible. Does a rabbit take a direct route? No. Does a hedgehog? Nope. Foxes? Never. Well then, he has to replicate these woodland creatures’ movements to track the routes they have been and investigate their goings on. To outsiders it may seem like he is dawdling and that he has no plan. Oh, he has a plan.

Sometimes his owners get a bit frustrated with him, yanking on his lead if he is still connected to them, or calling him back to them (good luck with that). They seem to think that that the walk part of their day is a chore. Something to tick off of a list. Errr, no, it’s the whole point of the day.

The zigs and zags are the adventures. Within a zig he finds out that there wasn’t just one rabbit scurrying about earlier, but two. During a zag he found a hidden mound of squished manure that was begging for a good sniff. Imagine if he had missed out on these?!
What can you learn from your dog?

We are always rushing to our destinations. Which is the fastest choice of roads… would a train be quicker… if we leave at a certain time, can we miss the traffic. We want to blank out the travel and simple relocate ourselves to the place we are trying to get to. Could you add a little zig into your commuting routine? Could you zag on the way back from a school run?

Take the scenic route by zigging and zagging and discover something.

Love the autumn

Cooper loves the autumn. Towards the end of summer, he is beginning to get a bit fed up of all the endless panting and needing to detour to puddles for a mid-walk water top-up. The black parts of his fur always seem to be aglow as he pads along under the sun and he prefers to take his investigation deep into undergrowth to find some respite.

The first sign that autumn is coming is that he sees all his favourite trees start to change from bright greens into browns, golds and reds. And then, one day, leaves begin to fall off. In his garden, the big tree at the back also begins to drop those big green, not-tasty-at-all apples onto his lawn. Whilst the apples are a pointless food, they do seem to attract some interesting characters into his domain so they have their use. Though these apples are sour and difficult to eat, creatures like to take nibbles on their detour across the grass, rubbing their scent deliciously on blades.

Love the autumnWalks are quite different too. Gone is the warmth from the pavement, tickling and teasing his paws as he traipses along. Instead he likes to watch his breath puff out in front of him. It’s funny how he only sees his breath half the year and he huffs it in all directions to see it appear and then be whisked away to be mingled with all the other air, way up into the sky. His owner doesn’t seem to want to see his own breath, and hides his face in a big, warm piece of fabric. He’s missing out.

Oh and the smells! Smoke from bonfires in the distance, damp soggy wet leaves gently rotting and so many creatures darting around preparing for colder times. Squirrels are one of Cooper’s favourite curiosities. They cheat, of course, scampering up tree trunks they know he can’t follow them up. Cheeks bulging with nuts. But the chase is always glorious and one day, oh one day, he will master climbing sideways up a tree.

Now while Cooper loves walks, in this season it’s lovely to get back home and find a warm spot by a heater to curl up in for a lovely nap. His little out-of-breath body squishes deep into cushions and blankets and it’s a wonderfully satisfying way to recover and think and then dream about all the creatures he saw on his travels. His mind intermingles deep colours and complicated smells and paints beautifully comforting imagery as he drifts off.

The autumn is a wonderful time of year for an investigating dog.

 

What can you learn from your dog?

Autumn is when nature starts slowing down again. All the bright, energetic colours begin to fade and we’re surrounded by cosy warm colours to take us up to winter. Pack away your flimsy wardrobe and gather your knits from the attic. Buy yourself a soft new gorgeous scarf you can burrow your face into.

Sync up with the change in pace and love your autumn.